Common virus could speed up cystic fibrosis

A brand-new research study has actually discovered that cytomegalovirus, which is generally inactive in individuals who have it, can end up being active once again in individuals with cystic fibrosis who establish lung infections. New research study checks out the function of cytomegalovirus in cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is an acquired condition. It triggers damage … Read more

Actinomycosis: Causes, types, symptoms, and diagnosis

Actinomycosis is a uncommon, infectious illness wherein micro organism unfold from one a part of the physique to a different by physique tissues. Over time, it can lead to linked abscesses, ache, and irritation. It might probably have an effect on the pores and skin or deeper areas inside the physique and generally the blood. … Read more

Urinary tract infection: Causes, symptoms, and prevention

Urinary tract infections are caused by microbes such as bacteria overcoming the body’s defenses in the urinary tract. They can affect the kidneys, bladder, and the tubes that run between them. They are one of the most common types of infection and account for around 8.1 million visits to a doctor every year. The urinary … Read more

Releasing an immune system brake could help patients with rare but fatal brain infection: Small-scale, clinical study offers early hope for developing a treatment

PML lesions in the brain. MRI of a PML patient showing significant lesions in the brain (white signal). Credit: Image courtesy of Daniel S. Reich, M.D., Ph.D., NINDS The anti-cancer drug pembrolizumab has shown promise in slowing or stopping the progression of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a typically fatal infection of the brain caused by … Read more

Bacteria flip an electric switch to worsen food poisoning: Infection-driven change in macrophage movements disseminates bacteria throughout the body

Salmonella bacteria flip an electric switch as they hitch a ride inside immune cells, causing the cells to migrate out of the gut toward other parts of the body, according to a new study publishing on April 9 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Yaohui Sun and Alex Mogilner of New York University and … Read more

Releasing an immune system brake could help patients with rare but fatal brain infection

MRI of a PML patient showing significant lesions in the brain (white signal). Credit: Irene Cortese, M.D. The anti-cancer drug pembrolizumab has shown promise in slowing or stopping the progression of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), a typically fatal infection of the brain caused by the JC virus (JCV). This finding comes from a small-scale study … Read more

11 cases of Candida auris reported at Singapore public hospitals since 2012

A strain of Candida auris cultured in a petri dish at a laboratory. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons / Shawn Lockhart – Centers for Disease Control) SINGAPORE: Eleven cases of Candida auris infections at public hospitals have been reported between 2012 and 2019, said the Ministry of Health (MOH) on Tuesday (Apr 9).  They were “isolated and sporadic” cases, said MOH, … Read more

Deadly Fungal ‘Superbug’ Spreads Worldwide, Alarming Scientists

Credit: Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library/Getty Images A deadly fungal infection that is resistant to major antimicrobial medications is spreading globally, and scientists aren't sure where it came from. The fungus, called Candida auris, is a yeast that normally lives harmlessly on the skin and mucous membranes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention … Read more

Synthetic antibody rapidly prevents Zika infection in mice and non-human primates

A DNA-encoded monoclonal antibody prevents Zika infection in mice and non-human primates, researchers report April 5 in the journal Molecular Therapy. Injections of synthetic DNA encoding the potent anti-Zika monoclonal antibody ZK190 resulted in high production of ZK190 for weeks to months, effectively controlling infection in all animals. The new platform for monoclonal-antibody gene delivery … Read more

Three years after undergoing gene therapy, his ‘last shot’ hit the target

Gene therapy was a ‘last shot’ In late 2015, Brenden Whittaker was the first subject in a CGD gene therapy trial at the Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. He is with David A. Williams, the Leland Fikes Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. Rose Lincoln/Harvard file photo Young man, who rebounded after … Read more

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